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Technologies for Resource/Energy Recovery from Sewage Sludge

The sources of this database are the evaluation reports on technologies for resource/energy recovery from sewage sludge issued by the Sewerage Technology Development Project (SPIRIT21) Committee under the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Japan in 2007 and 2008. Global Environment Centre Foundation (GEC) hereby introduces the technologies through its database. We hope this database will widely serve to help decision makers and engineers in overseas countries to adopt and apply environmentally sound technologies to reuse sewage sludge not as waste but resources.

Contents
Production of biosolid fuel from sewage sludge
Hitachi Zosen Corporation
Phosphorus Recovery from Sewage Sludge Incinerator Ash
METAWATER Co., Ltd.
Production of Activated Carbon from Sewage Sludge and Cost Reduction of Sludge Treatment by Effective Utilization
Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd.
Energy Recovery from Sewage Sludge and Biomass with Synchronous Digestion
Tsukishima Kikai Co., Ltd.
Anaerobic Co-digestion System with Low Running Cost of Power Generation
JFE Engineering Corporation
Anaerobic Digestion Process with Ozonation for Economically Feasible Energy Production from Municipal Sludge
Hitachi Plant Technologies, Ltd.
Methane Fermentation System of Sewage Sludge and Raw Garbage, and Carbonization-activation for Utilization
Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd.

Background

In March 2002, SPIRIT21 (Sewage Project, Integrated and Revolutionary Technology for 21st Century), an innovative technology development project, was implemented with the extensive cooperation of the private sector, academic institutes and municipalities in Japan. This project aims to guide and promote technology development initiated by the private sector in priority areas to address various challenges facing sewerage projects, and to introduce new technologies quickly and broadly.

As the first theme of SPIRIT21, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (MLIT) selected "Combined Sewer Outflow Control Technologies" and focused on developing technologies for three years from fiscal 2002 to 2004. Furthermore, the MLIT addressed the second theme of SPIRIT21, "Lead to Outstanding Technology for Utilization of Sludge Project (LOTUS Project)" to introduce new technologies quickly and widely, thus reducing the cost of using sewage sludge under the Biomass Nippon Strategy as a countermeasure for global warming through sewerage projects.

In September 2005, the Medium- to Long-Term Sewerage Vision Subcommittee of the Sewerage Policy Research Committee compiled Sewerage Vision 2100: From Sewerage to Passage of Circulation. The Vision advocates that sewerage is a core feature in building a sustainable, recycling-oriented society and that appropriate sewerage systems must be built for the 21st century. It also describes the future of a "Way to Resources." To achieve this future, the Way to Resources Committee was set up to discuss the use of resources and energy in the sewerage sector, medium-term global warming countermeasures, and other topics. Concurrently, to facilitate the use of local biomass through sewerage facilities, the MLIT has strengthened the New-Generation Sewerage Support Program (Use of Untapped Energy Resources).

The LOTUS Project, which was planned as part of the above general measures by the government, aims to achieve the ideal Way to Resources by launching economically feasible technologies.

Wastewater treatment necessarily and permanently involves the production of sewage sludge. The LOTUS Project, a technology development project which aims to reduce the cost of sewage sludge recycling, is developing the following two technologies.

(1) Zero sludge discharge technology
Technology for recycling more cheaply than disposing of sewage sludge to ensure beneficial use of sludge

(2) Green sludge energy technology
Technology for generating electricity at the same or lower cost than the price of utility power, by using sewage sludge and other biomass energy sources to help mitigate global warming
The Project began to solicit applications in December 2003, and much development work has been done on selected technologies since fiscal 2005. The Sewerage Technology Development Project (SPIRIT21) Committee has helped set up two research and development committees: the Zero Sludge Discharge Technology Research and Development Committee, and the Green Sludge Energy Technology Research and Development Committee.
The technologies developed through the LOTUS projects were compiled into technical evaluation reports by the Zero Sludge Discharge Technology Research and Development Committee and the Green Sludge Energy Technology Research and Development Committee, and reviewed by the SPIRIT21 Committee in 2007 and 2008.


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